Virtual Tours

Loch Gallery is excited to announce an exhibition of new paintings by Shannon Craig Morphew. Born in St. John's, Newfoundland in 1977, the artist's extensive travels throughout Canada and Great Britain have influenced her unique and vibrant vision. Known for her highly energetic and linear style, Shannon Craig Morphew redefines landscape through abstraction. Her use of ink, paint washes and thick strokes of colour are characteristic of her approach to painting. Depicting snow-capped fjords and quintessential homes in Newfoundland to windswept trees and children playing on Georgian Bay, she skillfully captures the essence of inspiring Canadian locations. Expressive and refined, these new works demonstrate the artist's unique style and express her meaningful presence in Canadian art.

Art Gallery of Northumberland, Victoria Hall, West Wing, Third Floor 55 King Street West Cobourg | Ontario | K9A 2M2

 

Ron Bolt: Constructing Wonder

A 50 Year Retrospective

 

“The purpose of art is not the release of a momentary ejection of adrenaline but rather the gradual, lifelong construction of a state of wonder and serenity.” – Glenn Gould

 

In this exhibition, the viewer is travelling through over fifty years of Ron Bolt’s oeuvre, experiencing the peripatetic journeyman through paintings, drawings, and prints. These are the careful markings of a man who moved, in the 1960s, from the world of graphic art to that of a fine artist whose focus has been on both understanding and appreciating the sacredness and sublimity of nature.

 

Bolt is the quixotic voyager with camera in hand observing not only the grand vista, but the minutiae of the scene before him. Capturing light on water impossible to observe by the human eye, but there, caught by the lens, manipulated through ink, paint, and collage by the intermediary, the artist who presents the world to the viewer in a way recognizable… but not. We may think we know the landscape, but the details in this work draw us in, asks us to literally look more closely and then forces us out again as we contemplate anew.

 

Environmentalism can be seen as a core theme of Bolt’s work. As he has travelled around the world over the past decades, he has seen, first-hand, the destruction and degradation of the world around him. He has remarked that “we are quite possibly living in the twilight of the natural world as we have known it. In that regard, my work is an act of preservation. To preserve the natural world is to preserve a language of the wind and shifting light, of stillness, silence and space.” The work, then, is more than an homage to nature, but a rallying cry. These worlds, whether in detail or panoramic view are majestic and worthy, not only of our contemplation, but of our support.

 

Ron Bolt was born in Toronto in 1938. He graduated as a gold medallist from Northern Technical School and furthered his art studies through courses at the Ontario College of Art and Ryerson Polytechnic. He was the 27th President of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts, awarded the Canada 125 Medal in 1992, the Queen’s Jubilee Medal in 2002, and the RCA’s Centennial Medallion in 2005.

His work has been shown in over a hundred and twenty solo and group exhibitions.

“In this collection I have revisited past experience. Walking on an Atlantic beach in the Algarve, Portugal; a glimpse from a railway car window of the tree lined Shuswap Lake, BC; the late afternoon skies of Southern California; the “nameless hour” in the hills of Northumberland county, Ontario; the crash of surf in Nova Scotia; a weekend in Georgian Bay. Paintings are a way of remembrance. I hope you enjoy them.” 

Ron Bolt, Cobourg, Oct, 23

Loch Gallery is excited to present a new collection of watercolours and oil paintings by Barry McCarthy in our Toronto gallery. The artist will be present in the gallery from 2 – 4pm on Saturday, November 4th.

 

"Based in southwestern Ontario, McCarthy first painted and exhibited the farm country surrounding Fergus, with its Grand River and majestic waterfalls. After studying fine art at the University of Guelph, McCarthy’s appreciation of Dutch landscape painting of the 17th century stimulated his passion for the watercolours. Gradually, searching for expanded views and coastlines, a family visit to Atlantic Canada led to summer images of Newfoundland and Nova Scotia. His plethora of visual discoveries soon became oil paintings. 

The new medium allowed him to adopt and refine the light and transparency that made his watercolours so memorable. The small watercolour studies provide him with confidence and comfort in a medium for which he is renowned. These studies are then committed into a large format in oil. Enlightened by his constant travels throughout Canada and abroad, McCarthy always seeks new imagery and ideas for his compositions. He looks for subjects or situations imbued not merely with beauty but with a sense of angst and tension."

 

Anja Karisik

 

“Historically, storytelling has always been a much enjoyed social and cultural activity. Painting is no different. There is an abstract quality to my work. There are organic forms juxtaposed with geometric shapes. The viewer’s eye flows from left to right much like reading a book. The foreground introduces the background. The midground is the comprehensive story: it sets the stage for the heat and the power. Boxes and squares dot the space, organic shapes play with the light keeping the flow of eye movement. Subject matter contributes to the story’s mystery! Much like a play…. the stage is set! Every painting tells a story!"

 

Barry McCarthy

This latest exhibition by Philip Craig showcases his exploration of both his homes in Newfoundland and Ontario. Inspired by the coastal communities of Newfoundland, where he spent ten years, and the iconic landscape of Ontario, Philip presents a collection of oil paintings that portray his experiences and inspiration from both provinces. From the rugged coastal scenes of Newfoundland to the serene beauty of Ontario rocks, trees and lakes, Philip's artworks offer a balanced reflection of the diverse natural wonders found in both regions. This exhibition celebrates the unique charm and significance of both Newfoundland and Ontario in Philips artistic journey.

Loch Gallery is excited to announce the exhibition of new paintings by Tony Luciani. The exhibition also includes a special collection of four paintings which were begun as drawings in 1984 and completed in 2023.

 

Tony Luciani was born in Toronto, Ontario in 1956. Growing up in Toronto, Luciani was able to pursue the best possible creative education. He attended Central Technical School, Sheridan College, and from 1975 - 1978, the Ontario College of Art. Tony received his degree along with post-graduate study in the off-campus program in Florence, Italy. He was awarded the George A. Reid Scholarship (OCA) and was a three-time Elizabeth Greenshields Foundation Grant recipient.

 

Upon his return from post-graduate study in Italy, Luciani left Toronto for rural Ontario and as a result, small towns and landscapes became a major source of inspiration in his work. It was also during this time, when Tony first visited his familial villages in Italy, that he began preliminary study for the collection of four paintings that is included in this exhibition. The remaining four paintings in the exhibition were completed in 2024, after Luciani returned to his familial villages. 

 

"These four paintings were born in 1984. I stayed in a tiny stone cottage in the village of Carrufo, Italy, high up in the mountains of Abruzzo, about 3 hours east of Rome. My family came from there. It was here and the surrounding villages that I discovered what it was like to be a 'real' artist. I did many drawings on location, which were to become paintings later on when I returned home to Canada. Of the dozens that were eventually realized as finished watercolours, all sold through Nancy Poole’s Studio (Loch Gallery location), I left five untouched. Fast forward to 2023, and I find them in the very same leather portfolio I used to transport my artwork back home in 1984."

 

Luciani returned to Canada with his drawings in tow, and began to paint and exhibit full time. As mentioned by the artist, he did use several drawings to execute watercolours, leaving five untouched. After years of national and international success and recognition, Tony returned to these drawings and also to his familial villages. 

 

"I returned to my three family villages in August, 2023.

This time, however, I physically walked into my art subjects. To experience again the feeling of standing at my easel creating these detailed line drawings brought back so many emotions. I so loved hearing the sounds of clucking chickens echoing throughout the old, narrow cobblestone streets, or the clanging of bells from curious goats meandering about. I remember losing a whole box of Wolff’s Carbon pencils to one fellow. I knew he liked them, because he kept coming back for more."

 

Luciani's dedication to detail is exemplified within these works. You must look closely and be attentive in your viewing of these works. You may miss the abandoned shoes or scattered nails at the bottom of a stone-riddled staircase, the life within the crumbling landscape. You might miss the intricately carved faces that embellish cracking wooden doors, a living memory etched into time. You might miss a small bouquet of red flowers at the end of a winding, unsteady staircase, or the church steeple that peeks out from stone arches. You might miss the intimate details that give context to the deep affection that Luciani has for these places. But if you look closely, you may stumble upon a sentiment, just as you would if you were to explore these villages yourself. In Luciani's work there is an element of discovery and exploration that is not only present when viewing the work, but also during the making. 

 

"As an artist, during the painting process, I get so immersed with what I’m doing that I emotionally enter my canvas. From there, I contemplate wandering around, observing my subject from different vantages and viewpoints. I walk around within the painting, touching objects and observing the light transform into shadows. The support ceases to be ‘flat art’, and crystalizes into the three dimensions of depth and space. It transcends the aesthetic to a feeling of inclusion. I become ‘one’ with the work."



The time that Luciani spent with these paintings is evident in their personal qualities. The details show a love and understanding of these villages, and an attentiveness that they deserve. When looking at preliminary drawings for these paintings, one can see a conversation emerge between artist and artwork. Each line, a call and response for meaning and understanding. As this conversation became more enveloping, an alliance was formed, and the artist and artwork became one. 

 

With these paintings, Luciani creates portraits of these villages, painting over the drawings that were completed forty years prior. As Tony layers paint over these initial drawings, he recalls his past self, these layers come together to create a complete portrait. In this way, the paintings also function as self-portraits, showing the life that Tony has lived since beginning these works. 



"My desire was to directly paint onto the drawings as intended 40 years earlier, but I wanted to do it in oil instead of watercolour. The connection was important to me, and not to transfer the images to canvas. So, with the help of transparent gesso, these four paintings were finally finished in 2023. I did keep one last drawing, just to satisfy my urge to keep it as is.

It is said that every painting an artist creates is a form of self-portrait.

With these four works, completed after four decades of avoidance, I give to you, my portrait…

…but forty years older."

 

The result of exhibiting this collection of paintings alongside four new works is a union of the artist's past and current practice, and a survey of time for these villages, Luciani's work, and Luciani himself. 

Loch Gallery is excited to announce the exhibition of new paintings by Philip Craig. In his latest collection, Philip Craig investigates the methodical qualities of the formal garden. A study in their geometric and symmetrical characteristics, this subject allows Philip to juxtapose the aimed perfection of these gardens with the wild nature of the plants that inhabit them. Through expressive brushwork, captivating compositions, and an impeccable understanding of light, Philip leads us down the path of exploration. What ensues is formal but also relaxed, calm but also full of life. 

In this exhibition, Valerie Palmer, DP Brown, Carol Stewart, and W. David Ward share with us their most recent work. An exciting look into the countless hours that these talented artists devote to their work, these most recent paintings reflect their respective artistic journeys, embody their unique perspectives, and evoke powerful emotions. Each artwork, a testament to their dedication and creativity, offers us the chance to experience their vision, to reflect, and to appreciate what art can do.

Loch Gallery is delighted to present a Collection of Important Canadian Historical paintings.  This exhibition spans over a century of Canadian art, and includes paintings by Cornelius Krieghoff, Paul Peel, Tom Thomson, the Group of Seven, David Milne, and William Kurelek among others.

Loch Gallery specializes exclusively in Canadian and European historical works of significance, and established contemporary artists with an emphasis on paintings and sculptures. Established in Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1972, the gallery has become an institution, representing many of the country’s most important living artists, while continuing to specialize in 19th and 20th century fine art.

Loch Gallery offers expertise in the art of collecting. Our knowledge and commitment will ensure that you are building not only a collection, but also a timeless legacy that future generations will treasure. For five decades, we have quietly and confidentially established a number of the finest art collections in Canada. Collections of art such as these cannot simply be purchased.  Paintings and sculptures must first be discovered, vetted and then considered before asking a client to deliberate an acquisition.

Collecting art is a journey. It will enrich your life and enhance your investment. It is the culmination of a relationship between the artist, the collector and the dealer.

Introducing Ben Woolfitt | Contemporary New Arrivals

June 7 - June 28 Toronto

Fall Historical Collection

September 22 - October 6 Toronto

Patrick Amiot | Summer Selection

May 26 - June 2 Toronto

Loch Gallery is delighted to feature a selection of spirited sculptures by the urban folk artist Patrick Amiot. The exhibition includes work using recycled materials alongside work that features the artist's roots in ceramics. Amiot's whimsical portrayal of his subjects spans his entire career and is encapsulated by this selection. From wall-mounted, protruding cityscapes to kinetic sculpture and furniture, the artwork is sure to delight and inspire. While Amiot excels in spontaneous but purposeful sculpting, his partner, Brigitte Laurent completes the artwork with a sophisticated sense of colour and precise brushwork. Together, they create artwork that is playful, insightful, and endlessly enjoyable.

Spring High Realism in Toronto

May 5 - May 19 Toronto

Keith Harder | From Perception to Insight

May 3 - May 19 Toronto, Calgary

Keith Harder’s exhibition, From Perception to Insight, is a survey of his career including paintings from the 1980s to now. The Calgary iteration of the show will also feature Gravitas: Inside Out, an interactive and immersive experience that allows viewers to virtually explore Harder’s land installation Gravitas.
 

Keith Harder was introduced to acrylic and oil painting in the Three Hills High School art program taught by his father. Painting became the central feature of his education through several degrees and then in a 36 year career as a university Professor of Studio Art.


Early in his formative development he was mentored at the University of Calgary by the realist painter John Hall. The formal side of his painting practice was influenced later by abstract painters, Doug Haynes and Phil Darrah at the University of Alberta. Studying other paintings by artists such as Rackstraw Downes, John Salt, and Antonio Lopez Garcia also contributed to Harder’s methods and thought. Eventually he was inspired by Canadian artist Jack Chambers to investigate the numinous quality of the external visual experience and, similarly, chose a descriptive approach as a painting methodology for his investigations.
 

In the early years of his practice, a faithfulness to observation dominated his approach. By paying close attention to describing appearances he hoped to reveal moments of import. Initially photographic sources were used but later direct observation was included in certain projects.
 

The descriptive methodology was applied to a variety of subjects and genres, including landscape, still life, and portraiture. Later in his career, narrative features and elements of interpretation and invention were added into this body of work. The current exhibition samples an array of these approaches.
 

While there have been a variety of investigations over the course of Harder’s career, it is possible to detect a particular interest threading through the last four decades of his production. This interest can be traced through the intermittent imagery of weather, sky, and flight. Such images lend themselves to the consideration of themes that could range from joy, to struggle, to threat, and to loss. In addition to such content, many paintings invoke a deep sense of being in place, and in time.
 

Thematic contents get developed within the arena of thought known as hermeneutics, as they seek to winkle out, understand and interpret the nature of the numinous that are encountered in the experience of being. Taking the form of visual experiments, the paintings are concentrated attempts to detect and reveal the pulse of meaning within the daily rush and grind of living. Metaphor and allusion come into play in the choices of subject, staging, and the quality of light. These are the means by which something greater might arise than merely the sum of parts.

On the Other Side

April 12 - April 28 Toronto, Calgary

Nick Rooney's 2022 solo exhibition Nature’s Edge used natural history and the symbolism attributed to animals to examine how the edge of each space functions as both a beginning and an end. On the Other Side builds on these ideas to further explore the movement through this liminal space. Liminal space is defined as the space that sits between the inner and the outer, the subjective and the objective, reflection and action, and stimulus and response.

In removing natural colours and reducing to a monochromatic palette, Rooney's focus becomes the relationships both in colour harmony and mutualism. The search for balance in the geometric forms and empty space removes the animal subjects from any traditional setting and context. This sets up a dialogue that creates and explores an environment rooted in the transition where tension, pressure, and struggle often reside.

Nick Rooney (b. 1989 Canada) obtained his MA in Painting from the University of the Arts London, at the Camberwell College of Arts in London, England. Much of his early career was spent focusing on the craft of oil painting and developing a contemporary art practice deeply rooted in art history. His current studio work and research look at the relationship between the reductive formalism of geometric minimalism and the complexity of classical realism. Nick has had the opportunity to exhibit both nationally and internationally, having been selected to participate in the Saatchi Gallery’s exhibition London Grads Now. Nick Rooney now resides in Calgary (Mohkínsstsisi), Alberta where he is an instructor at the University of Calgary and the Alberta University of the Arts.

Louis De Niverville, The Art of Collage

February 3 - February 17 Toronto

What allows a painting to be most available to sustained attention is not only its physical proximity to the viewer but also the artist’s closeness to the impulse of its making. In Louis de Niverville’s painted collage that kind of closeness always involved time as a condition of the making, and on occasion time became a theme in itself.

In 1939, when de Niverville was six years old, he was “stashed away” in the hospital for “about four and half years.” Because spinal tuberculosis was thought to be easily communicable, he was permitted to be visited only occasionally by his parents. To survive emotionally and psychologically, he began to “cut out comic strip characters (Superman, Flash Gordon, Mandrake the Magician, Blondie)”. He later wrote, “I kept them all in a little envelope and when I wanted one of them I would bring it out and make it talk and give it a life.”

In the mid 1960’s during a crisis in in his technical and creative process, he returned to his childhood technique of cutting out paper. Now he painted the sheets first, often vigorously or using arcane techniques. A pair of scissors was also a way of making line, a kind of drawing. But what allowed it all to happen was the cut out. By way of collage, de Niverville effectively reinvented not only his celebrated painting and drawing practices but he also returned to his earliest and most urgent form of making. A small sampling of this painted collage practice can be seen in Louis de Niverville, The Art of Collage which includes work made over forty years.

The earliest work in the exhibition, Time Machine is a masterpiece of de Niverville’s mid-career. A central figure seems to be entirely wrapped in strangely elegant garments ­­­– a beautiful, brown trench coat and a pinkish hood. These garments might be made of paper and perhaps, at the same time, they are not. Brass clock pieces like clouds fall from the blue sky. Some of these formations look more like living entities than machine parts or cloud vapours, and they evoke ghostly, nineteenth century cyanotype photos. Something to do with memory and its traces.

When de Niverville was in the hospital he often watched the scene visible across the road. He would “hang onto the clouds and marvel at their formations […]. In fact I saw my father quite often in the clouds […]. It was like being at the movies…. like a never ending spectacle.” With Time Machine De Niverville has produced an arresting image of time. It is easily identifiable as the time experienced when one is ill or in hospital, when clock time has been detonated. It is also the time that exists for everyone in the mind, when the eyes are turned inward, torn away from time keeping devices. Fantastic, and yet a layered, associative image of reality.

~ E.C. Woodley

All quotations are from Louis de Niverville’s “Pentimenti” in the catalogue for Louis de Niverville Retrospective curated by Joan Murray at the Robert McLaughlin Gallery and travelling to thirteen venues between the spring of 1978 and the winter of 1980.

 

Ron Bolt "Mountain Memory: The Rocky Mountain Series"

February 24 - March 17 Toronto

Loch Gallery has the pleasure to announce “Mountain Memory: The Rocky Mountain Series", an exhibition of exceptional new oil paintings by Ron Bolt.

In Bolt’s own words he describes the inspiration for this series:

When I was sixteen my father took the family, by train, to Vancouver. For five days the train cars were our living room, kitchen and bedroom. From the dense, mysterious forests of the Precambrian shield, to Winnipeg and the big sky country of the prairies, we approached the mountains. They appeared on the horizon like a string of diamonds sparkling against a brilliant, cloudless blue. An image lodged permanently in my mind.

Almost seventy years have passed. In 2022 I took my second train trip through the Rockies. This collection reflects a very recent experience and the vivid memories of a young art student.


Favouring a camera as a sketching tool, Bolt uses photography to collect visual information and to revive emotional memory. Starting in Vancouver, Bolt’s recent journey took him to Kamloops before travelling through the Rocky Mountains. He stopped in Banff and Lake Louise before making his way through the Columbia Icefield and ending in Jasper. Prepared with his camera in hand, Bolt set out to capture the rugged wilderness and the imposing grandeur of the Rocky Mountains. The results are seen here through his paintings of “Summit #1 Columbia Ice Fields”, “Sunwapta Valley”, “High, Bright, and Clear”, and “Bow Falls”.

Winter Contemporary Group Exhibition

November 18 - December 16 Toronto

Loch Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of new and recent paintings by Leon Belsky, Ron Bolt, John B. Boyle, DP Brown, Rebecca Campbell , Philip Craig, Shannon Craig Morphew, Paul Fournier, John Hall, John Hansen, Ciba Karisik, Barry McCarthy, Louis de Niverville, and David Thauberger.

Philip Craig "New paintings: Trinity, Port Rexton and Bonavista"

October 28 - November 11 Toronto

 Loch Gallery is delighted to present "New paintings: Trinity, Port Rexton and Bonavista" an exhibition by Philip Craig featuring new paintings inspired by a recent trip to Newfoundland.

Philip Craig describes his latest collection of paintings:

Let me tell you about my relationship with Newfoundland.  In 1975 I took my small family— Diane and our one year old son Jordan—to live in Newfoundland where I worked as set designer for the CBC. These were very busy and wonderful years. As my family grew, so did my experience as a painter. The first exhibition of my work was held at the LSPU hall in downtown St. John's and consisted of landscapes and portraits inspired by my life in Newfoundland. As a set designer I had ample opportunity to travel the island and found an abundance of inspiration.

After ten years we packed up three children and returned to Ontario so that I could paint full time. I have returned to Newfoundland many times since. Each time I gravitate more and more towards the small communities of Trinity, Port Rexton and Bonavista where I can work and spend time with our dear old friends. This summer I set up my studio in a historic forge in the town of Trinity. This forge was beautifully restored with considerable effort by my good friend Chris O’Dea. I would rise early every morning and walk the streets of this ancient fishing port. The light would change and the morning mist would lift, revealing interesting compositions of the unique little houses and churches. Down by the shore I would find the boats and fishing stages reflected in the harbour. This trip had a marked effect on each piece in this exhibition; I shifted my pallet and paint application to tell the tale. There is no doubt that there is an emotional tug to return again and again to our rocky island home. —Philip Craig

Fall Contemporary Exhibition

October 14 - October 21 Toronto

The Loch Gallery is proud to feature works by a selection of our gallery artists including: Leon Belsky, Ron Bolt, Roberta Bondar, Gerard Burns, Philip Craig, Shannon Craig Morphew, Paul Fournier, John Hall, Ciba Karisik, Barry McCarthy, John McKee, Valerie Palmer, Barbara Pratt, Carol Stewart and David Thauberger.

Contemporary Realism: Featuring Valerie Palmer

September 30 - October 7 Toronto

Loch Gallery is delighted to present a special exhibition of Realism painting. In the first room of the gallery this exhibition will feature eight paintings by Valerie Palmer, including Valerie’s latest painting, Sea-Change. In the second room of the gallery we will be presenting a selection of new and recent paintings by D.P. Brown, John Hansen, Keith Harder, Ron Bolt, Bogdan Molea, Roberto Rosenman and W. David Ward, all working in the realism tradition.

Tony Luciani and Tyson Grumm

September 16 - September 23 Toronto

Loch Gallery Toronto is delighted to feature a selection of new and recent paintings by two masters of storytelling—Tony Luciani and Tyson Grumm.

When defining his work, Tony Luciani places himself in a tradition of realism that is interpretive rather than photographic. His paintings are all rooted in comprehensive preparatory drawings and studies which he completes from life on location. Once back in the studio these drawings are refined on a larger scale where details are eliminated or elaborated upon. While working on a painting, Luciani values equally the mood and feeling he gets from the subject, as well as the realistic likeness of the subject. The outcome is a painting into which the viewer is drawn—enthralled by the detail, and a curious to discover a deeper, more significant meaning.

Tyson Grumm, on the other hand, paints unique and nostalgic worlds that often blur the lines between past and present, and reality versus imagination. Grumm’s ingenious titles and freeze-frame images give a feeling that the viewer has stumbled into the middle of a story for which they must create their own narrative to continue the tale. Drawn entirely from his imagination, Grumm’s colourful and whimsical work incorporates humans, wild animals, and whimsical backdrops to create his surreal and fantastical world, into which he invites the viewer to become lost in the topsy-turvy wonderland.

Summer Selection

July 1 - July 22 Toronto

This summer, Loch Gallery Toronto is pleased to showcase a rotating selection of paintings, sculpture and photography by our gallery artists. We welcome art enthusiasts and collectors to view this exciting mix of styles, subjects and mediums created by artists of exceptional talent.

David Thauberger

June 3 - June 24 Toronto

David Thauberger, born in Holdfast, Saskatchewan is well known across Canada for his paintings of vernacular architecture and cultural icons. These works of popular culture and postcard images involve an articulate debate on art, culture, and how we view our world transcending regionalism while still capturing the heart of what it means to be from Saskatchewan.

Thauberger's achievements were recognized when he was awarded the Saskatchewan Order of Merit in 2012. He was named to the Order of Canada in 2008, was a recipient of the Lieutenant Governor's Saskatchewan Artist Award in 2009, and received the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2012. Recently David Thauberger’s career was the subject of a retrospective exhibition co-produced by the Mendel Art Gallery, Saskatoon and the Mackenzie Art Gallery, Regina touring across Canada 2014-2016.

His work is part of many public collections throughout our country including the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa; the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Halifax; the Burnaby Art Gallery; the Glenbow Museum, Calgary; the Mendel Gallery, Saskatoon; the Mackenzie Gallery, Regina; the Winnipeg Art Gallery; the Art Gallery of Hamilton; and the Musée d’Art Contemporain, Montreal.

Shannon Craig Morphew

May 13 - May 27 Toronto, Calgary

Loch Gallery is delighted to present a much anticipated new collection of paintings by Shannon Craig Morphew opening in Toronto and Calgary on Saturday, May 14th. With her personal expression of landscape through abstraction, Shannon has painted fresh interpretations of spectacular Canadian vistas. In this latest exhibition Shannon takes the viewer on a journey across the country. From snow-capped fjords in Newfoundland, windswept trees on Georgian Bay, dramatic prairie skies to the emerald lakes of the Rocky Mountains, she skillfully captures the essence of these inspiring locations in her unique style.

Influenced by Japanese woodblock prints, Shannon's use of line, paint washes, and thick strokes of colour express a dynamic, personal creative vision. Holding a deep respect and reverence for the natural world Shannon believes that personal expression through painting has no boundaries.

Shannon Craig Morphew

May 13 - May 27 Toronto, Calgary

Loch Gallery is delighted to present a much anticipated new collection of paintings by Shannon Craig Morphew opening in Toronto and Calgary on Saturday, May 14th. With her personal expression of landscape through abstraction, Shannon has painted fresh interpretations of spectacular Canadian vistas. In this latest exhibition Shannon takes the viewer on a journey across the country. From snow-capped fjords in Newfoundland, windswept trees on Georgian Bay, dramatic prairie skies to the emerald lakes of the Rocky Mountains, she skillfully captures the essence of these inspiring locations in her unique style.

Influenced by Japanese woodblock prints, Shannon's use of line, paint washes, and thick strokes of colour express a dynamic, personal creative vision. Holding a deep respect and reverence for the natural world Shannon believes that personal expression through painting has no boundaries.

Ron Bolt

April 22 - May 6 Toronto, Calgary

 

Loch Gallery is proud to present an exhibition by renowned Canadian artist Ron Bolt, featuring six new large scale paintings on display in our Toronto and Calgary galleries.

In his own words, Bolt writes, “I revel in the infinite variety of the natural world and my work is an act of preservation. To preserve the natural world is to preserve a language. It’s the language of the wind and shifting light, of silence, stillness and space. It allows us to converse with the other voices, the voices of our true aspirations, our regrets, our hopes.”

Into the Light: New Paintings by Philip Craig

April 1 - April 15 Toronto

 

Loch Gallery is proud to present “Into the Light”, a new collection of paintings celebrating our Canadian landscape by Philip Craig. In his latest collection, Philip takes the viewer on a journey through his richly expressive brushwork and his impeccable knowledge of light. Philip not only captures the physical terrain, but his paintings also epitomize the sense of awe and wonder of Canada's diverse landscape.

"Light is the engine of my composition. I use multiple layers of coloured glazes with alternating layers of solid deliberate strokes of paint to convey the effect of light on my subject. This interprets my experience and vision in a direct way with the viewer." - Philip Craig

Nick Rooney: Nature's Edge

April 6 - April 22 Calgary

Nick Rooney (b. 1989 Canada) obtained his MA in Painting from the University of the Arts London, at the Camberwell College of Arts in London, England and now resides in Calgary.

Much of his early career was spent focusing on the craft of oil painting developing a contemporary art practice deeply rooted in art history. His current studio work and research look at the relationship between the reductive formalism of geometric minimalism and the complexity of classical realism.

Rooney’s work has always been greatly influenced by and stimulated by art history. The body of work titled “Nature’s Edge” uses natural history and the symbolism attributed to animals to examine how the edge of each space functions as both a beginning and an end. Rooney seeks out subjects with rich historical and narrative meanings that resonate with him. He is also very interested in the emergence of abstraction. While aware of the denial of meaning in formalist criticism, he is convinced that even the most simplified shapes suggest the unknown, leading to greater insights and spiritual truths. In his paintings, Rooney tries to suggest more than what meets the eye. By bringing together in one frame both his passion for representation, and minimalist geometric abstraction, Rooney is seeking to stimulate a deeper understanding of life. These disquieting juxtapositions are jarring, shaking us out of our complacency. By heightening our awareness, painting can help us to be more reflective as we try to comprehend the fragmented perception and uncertainties of life at nature's edge.

Paul Fournier

March 4 - March 18 Toronto

Loch Gallery is delighted to announce the addition of Paul Fournier as one of our Contemporary Artists and his first solo exhibition with our gallery.

Throughout his illustrious career, Paul Fournier has been influenced by his surroundings and the natural world. Fournier’s compositions explore a diverse range of subject matter in a completely unique way, from geological formations and underwater ecosystems to cosmic and atmospheric events caused by weather and light. Fournier invites the viewer into his fantastical worlds through his use of abstraction, bold colours, painterly brush strokes and diverse technical application.

Winter Contemporary Group Exhibition

February 18 - February 25 Toronto

 

Loch Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of new and recent paintings by Leon Belsky, Ron Bolt, Roberta Bondar, DP Brown, Philip Craig, Shannon Craig Morphew, Paul Fournier, John Hall, Hansen, Ciba Karisik, Barry McCarthy, John McKee, Bogdan Molea, Jacques Payette, David Thauberger, and W. David Ward.

Canadian Historical Collection

December 10 - December 17 Toronto

 

Loch Gallery is pleased to showcase a special collection of fine historical art in our Toronto Gallery.  For nearly five decades, Loch Gallery has quietly and confidentially established a number of the finest art collections in Canada. We offer expertise in the art of collecting—our knowledge and commitment will ensure that you are building not only a collection, but also a timeless legacy that future generations will treasure.

Contemporary Realism

November 19 - November 26 Toronto, Calgary

 

Loch Gallery continues its mandate of presenting the finest in Canadian realism. We are delighted to feature a selection of new paintings by D.P. Brown, John Hall, John Hansen, Tony Luciani, Valerie Palmer, W. David Ward and introducing Keith Harder, along with recent works by Leon Belsky, Ron Bolt and Gerard Burns.

Concurrently in Calgary, we are showing paintings by John Hall, Keith Harder, Nick Rooney, Patrick Cox, Roberto Rosenman, Leon Belsky, Ron Bolt.

We invite you to explore the plurality of realism in this exhibition.

Barry McCarthy: The Elora Gorge

November 5 - November 12 Toronto

It is with great pleasure to announce the opening of an exhibition of exceptional new oils & watercolours by renowned Canadian artist Barry McCarthy. This show will feature wondrously detailed and evocative paintings of the majestic Elora Gorge.

Philip Craig | Lily Ponds, Flowers and Flakes

October 15 - October 22 Toronto

 

Loch Gallery is delighted to present a two part exhibition "Lily Ponds, Flowers and Flakes" by Philip Craig featuring new paintings inspired by his wife's garden and the years he lived in Newfoundland.

Over the summer months, Philip was captivated by the colours and variety of flora from his wife Diane's garden. In the first room of the gallery Philip guides us through the lush garden filled with peonies, trilliums, gardenias, irises, and water lilies from his Otter Lake home.

In the second room of the gallery we are featuring a collection of paintings inspired by the years Philip and his family lived in Newfoundland. Through paintings of multicoloured homes in Trinity, fisherman pulling in the boats and the wooden "flakes" used for drying fish, Philip gives us a glimpse into some of the places he visited and sights he saw during his time in Newfoundland.

Ron Bolt

October 1 - October 8 Toronto

 

 

Ron Bolt is recognized across Canada and abroad as a painter of nature and the sea in a photo-realistic style. He began his career over 50 years ago as an abstractionist and has periodically returned to that idiom in works exploring music and foreign cultures. He does so again in this dynamic series concerning various musical terms and compositions. He explains this recent project in his own words.

“The 12 paintings entitled Night Music originated from the evocative time lapse photographs of the Toronto skyline taken by my partner Lauretta Holbrook. They express the vibrancy and drive of a great city. But, as well, and because of my musical studies that led to an associate diploma from the Royal Conservatory in Toronto, they suggested music. Visual representations of the sounds of the music I studied or that I have enjoyed listening to. In analysis and performance musicians consider such concepts as line, colour, form, dynamics and texture, all concepts that painters deal with. Pure music is recognized as the most abstract of art forms. It’s relation to the creation of visual art has always interested me. I hope you get as much pleasure from exploring these pieces as I did in making them.” - Ron Bolt

Shannon Craig Morphew

September 10 - October 1 Toronto, Calgary

Loch Gallery is delighted to present a much anticipated new collection of paintings by Shannon Craig Morphew. Opening in Toronto and Calgary on Saturday, September 11th, in this latest exhibition Shannon takes the viewer on a journey across the country, from her beloved Newfoundland to the majestic ranges of the Rockies. Influenced by Japanese woodblock prints, Shannon's use of line, paint washes, and thick strokes of colour express a dynamic, personal creative vision.

"Since the beginning, playing amongst the ocean eddies and windswept rocks of Newfoundland, I've held a deep respect and reverence for the natural world. In my paintings I'm able to distill the emotions I've felt at these times to give the viewer a feeling of open sky and powerful immensity of the landscapes that I've experienced first hand. Through abstraction I emphasize the open expanses of cool sky against a still, sunbathed field or a mountain stream where the craggy rocks guide powerful water currents down below." - Shannon Craig Morphew

Natural Explorations: New Paintings by Ron Bolt

September 25 - October 2 Toronto

Loch Gallery is delighted to present an exhibition of new paintings by renowned Canadian artist, Ron Bolt. The paintings in this recent collection continue to explore Ron's interest in light – its reflective qualities, how photography captures it and the magical ways in which it recasts the natural world.

In his own words, Bolt writes, “I revel in the infinite variety of the natural world and my work is an act of preservation. To preserve the natural world is to preserve a language. It’s the language of the wind and shifting light, of silence, stillness and space. It allows us to converse with the other voices, the voices of our true aspirations, our regrets, our hopes.”

Shannon Craig Morphew

September 11 - September 18 Toronto

Loch Gallery is excited to present a recent selection of paintings by Ontario's own Shannon Craig Morphew.

In this recent collection, the artist takes the viewer on a journey across the country. Through Morphew's dynamic use of line she captures the energy of the Canadian landscape. We start in the east with a sweeping panorama of the Newfoundland coast. Morphew then guides us through Northern Ontario with its granite rock formations and windswept pines, before reaching the wide open, vast skies of the Canadian Prairies, and ending up finally in the majestic ranges of the Rockies.

Influenced by Japanese woodblock prints, Morphew's style of active brushwork and minimal colour expresses a very modern, personal creative vision.

Summer Exhibition and Virtual Tour

July 10 - July 24 Toronto

Over the summer months, Loch Gallery Toronto will be featuring a selection of new arrivals and other stellar examples of artwork from our Contemporary artists. Featured in this exhibition is Patrick Amiot's latest sculpture "The Goal of the Century" and new paintings by Leon Belsky and David Thauberger, along side recent work by Ron Bolt, John B. Boyle, DP Brown, Tyson Grumm, John Hall, John Hansen, Bogdan Molea, Shannon Craig Morphew and Roberto Rosenman. Please check our exhibition page for upcoming summer exhibitions.

Loch Gallery Toronto Virtual Tour

May 28 - June 12 Toronto

Loch Gallery is pleased to present our first 3rd virtual exhibition.  As we navigate daily life and become accustomed to our new normal, we invite you to virtually tour our Toronto gallery from the comfort of your own home.

At this time the gallery is open by appointment only. If there are any artworks that you are interested in or would like to see in person, we would be happy to arrange a private viewing. Alternatively, we are also offering home delivery if you would prefer to view the artwork in your home.

To arrange a viewing or to schedule a home delivery, please contact the gallery by phone 416-964-9050 or email toronto@lochgallery.com. We look forward to welcoming you back to the gallery soon.